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20120901
20120930
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
does. at a meeting monday, mahmood ahmadinejad accused the united states of backing what he called a fake regime in israel, and that led to a walkout by israel's u.n. ambassador. >>> also monday, a wide-ranging interview with us, we asked him about the threat of an attack on iran's nuclear facilities and how his country would respond. would you retaliate against the united states if there's an attack by israel on iran? >> translator: well, by the principle of it, i don't take the threat serious. >> they're bluffing? >> translator: we don't even take them into account. i would like to ask, who's subservient to whom, the zionist to the united states government or the united states government to the zionist? >> you said that israel has no historical roots in the middle east, and the white house has now called that statement by you disgusting, offensive, and outrageous. would you like to apologize? >> translator: do they have roots? if they have roots, then just say they have roots. we don't have to fight over it. what should i apologize for? this is a technical and scientific fact, st
to be broadcast nationwide in the united states on the anniversary of 9/11, and that's why people came out yesterday to demonstrate to stop the airing of this movie which, of course, was never the case. it was just this online movie, offensive to islam. >> that's nbc's richard engel outside the u.s. embassy where you can see protests continue this morning in cairo, egypt. richard, thank you very much. >> we want to bring in andrea mitchell our chief foreign affairs correspondent. andrea, as we await any confirmation from the state department, what can you tell us about ambassador stevens, an experienced diplomat in the middle east. >> a career diplomat. this is a man who had gone to berkeley and had gotten a law degree and a degree from the national war college. he was fluent in french and arabic. he had been a peace corps volunteer in 1983 in morocco, teaching english before he joined the foreign service about nine years later. this is a man who has very adept at social media. he was active on facebook. he was very involved with the community. he had been in benghazi during the conflict,
, and may god continue to bless the united states of america. thank you. >> secretary of state hillary clinton speaking in the treaty room at the state department using very direct and solemn words to talk about the loss of four americans in these attacks at the consulate in benghazi, libya, saying that it's an attack that should shock the conscience of people of all faiths around the world, and as we wring back bring back in andl she asked the question that she said others would be asking, how could this help in a country we helped to liberate and a city we helped to save, andrea? >> reporter: that's the profound question, and she said she asked that question of herself, the question that others are asking. that's the question americans will be asking, the question that members of congress are going to be asking when we talk about all of the billions of dollars that we have spent. the american lives, not in rescuing libya but now four american lives lost after libya was supposedly on its way back. her other point, a very important point, was to say that this violates the conscience of
for the united states and for its relationship with that new government that is forming in libya? i've spoken to a senior administration official here who says that officials in libya are cooperating right now with u.s. officials. of course, this has taken a bit of a political turn as well, matt. president obama in his initial statement, while condemning the attacks, also said that he condemned all sorts of religious intolerance. mitt romney put out a statement, i'm going to read it to you, in which he said it's disgraceful that the obama administration's first response was not to condemn attacks on our diplomatic missions but to sympathize with those who waged the attacks. in response the obama campaign put out this statement, matt. we are shocked that at a time when the united states of america is confronting the tragic death of one of our diplomatic officers in libya governor romney would choose to launch a political attack, so even while they are dealing with this unfolding situation, politics still playing a role here, but, again, we are expecting president obama to address the nation fr
. in the corner there, that is the street that leads to the united states embassy. and for the last hour or so, we've been seeing egyptian security guards firing tear gas at protesters trying to keep them away from the embassy walls. a very similar scene going -- taking place right now in the city of yemen in the capital of yemen, where protesters even managed to breach the compound walls. >> reporter: another assault on a u.s. embassy, this time in yemen. protesters threw stones at the embassy walls in the capital. they climbed the gate, set fire, and raised posters denouncing a once obscure u.s.-based internet movie that portrays the prophet mohammed. personnel in yemen were reportedly moved to a secure location. in cairo, more clashes, but this time, it's egyptian security pushing back. they fired tear gas to drive protesters away from the u.s. embassy in cairo. and the new egyptian president rejected violence against u.s. diplomats in a televised statement and said he told that to president obama in a phone call this morning. wednesday night in an interview with telemundo, the president was as
the united states, calling for more democracy. now, there is an ongoing clash here as some demonstrators are trying to attract u.s. embassy, which is right on the edge of this square and you can see fear gas being fired from egyptian security forces trying to keep the demonstrators away from the u.s. embassy wall. a similar scene today in yemen, as an angry mob attacked the u.s. embassy compound in the city of sanaa a state department official says that all u.s. personnel that the embassy in sanaa have been accounted for and appear to be safe. another assault on a u.s. embassy, this time in yemen. protesters threw stones at the embassy walls in the capital, sanaa. they climbed the gate, set fires, and raised posters denouncing a once-obscure u.s.-based internet movie that portrays the prophet mohammed. personnel in yemen were reportedly moved to a secure location. in cairo, more clashes, but this time, it's egyptian security pushing back. they fired tear gas to drive protesters away from the u.s. embassy in cairo. and the new egyptian president rejected violence against u.s. diplomats in
, or is this something much deeper, a long simmering distrust of the united states? >> it's all the above. it's much long-simmering resentment of the united states. it has some legitimate reasons, but it's essentially a pretext, and it is not really about religion. it's about politics and world power. it's about what's taking place in these countries that are going through a tremendous complex, painful transition. take egypt, for instance, extremists and islamists with different interpretations of islam competing with the mainstream islamist group in egypt which is the muslim brotherhood. >> right. >> they whipped up frenzy against the movie initially, and then the president, who is very cynical, was looking to protect his flanks so he called for more demonstrations instead of containing the demonstrations or condemning them so what you have is a competition in egypt as to who is going to shape the future of egypt, and using this movie as a pretext. >> which raised the question. is this about the united states really at all, or is this about uncertainty in these people's own futures and their religious l
ties with israel by now, could have cut off all intelligence cooperation with the united states. none of that has happened. it's important at a difficult time like this to bear in mind where things could have gone in a much more negative direction. it's been a terrible week for the united states, but i'm still hopeful about a lot of the arab spring. we've got to navigate some tough times right now, and syria remains a huge mess. but if you ask me how things are compared to how i would have guessed a year ago, probably better than i would have surmised. >> the u.s. still controls pursestrings in as much of the foreign aid to that part of the world. will that allow the u.s. to continue to exert some influence? >> absolutely. i think president morsi knows this in egypt. it's part of why he's sensitive to the fact that his initial reaction to this video. however understandable at a religious level is inappropriate at a political level, at a leadership level. i'd like to hope he would have figured this out on his own, but it's nice to have $1.5 billion worth of leverage on our side. >> chu
east, the horn of africa over the last couple of weeks, protests against the united states. what is behind what seems to be this new wave of anti-americanism, in your opinion? >> well, i think, you know, if i can say one thing about america and the way it's viewed in this part of the world. i've just come back from my 88th visit to the middle east since leaving office. if i were you in america, i would not worry about being loved. that's not your role in the world, right? your role is to be strong and you are strong. what you have to understand in these circumstances there's two groups struggling for what's going on in the world. you have anti-american protesters burning the flag, saying terrible things and killing american people and you also have in libya, for example, after the tragic death of your ambassador there, thousands of people coming out protesting against the killers and demanding action taken against them so, you know, in the end, you've got to see this as a long struggle in which we've got to be on the side of the decent people, and there are decent people out ther
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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